Monthly Archives: August 2010

A Book Printer’s Tips: Plot Development

Great story ideas can start anywhere. Some writers start out with a general concept that needs to be defined. Others are inspired by ideas for beginnings or endings to the novels they want to pursue. But even the best ideas can’t make a successful book without a well-developed plotline. When creating a story from beginning to end, keep the following plot development steps in mind:

  • Identify the conflict. At least two characters must have opposing goals and only one of them can win. Knowing this from the beginning will help ensure the story doesn’t go off on unrelated tangents.
    • Begin with a crisis. Your book should relate a specific struggle the main character is going through. Without this, the main character has no motivation to continue through to the resolution. This crisis will also help define the character’s goal for the book.
    • Build the story. Once a story goal has been created for the character, they must fight to achieve it and thus, hold the reader’s attention. They should face an increasing number of obstacles with mounting difficulty as the story progresses.
      • Orchestrate the climax. The climax of a story is the turning point where the main character’s struggle is finally resolved. Here, they face their greatest obstacle. The reader must be brought to wonder whether they’ll succeed in their goal or not.
        • Wrap things up. The resolution portion of plot development can be the most important part of a book. The reader should leave your story with no unanswered questions, which means all loose ends should be tied up and plot points resolved.

        Don’t forget to include important details throughout your story that will make your character’s resolution realistic. Tools used by characters on either side of the conflict must be mentioned before the climax; otherwise the resolution will seem too orchestrated.

        Using these steps in your plot development will ensure your story concept comes to life on the page. Once your editing has been completed, send it off to the book printers at CMYK Graphix, Inc. As professional book printers, they have the knowledge and experience to help you self-publish your novel with all the customizations you require. They offer fast and easy quotes online at http://www.cmykgraphix.com and will be happy to do custom quotes by request. For more information, contact them at 1-800-698-2071 or email them today.

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        Book Printing and Writing Tips: Writing Dialogue

        Every good writer knows that dialogue is one of the key elements of any book. If it’s not conducted properly, dialogue can make the writing seem immature or unrealistic. It can even stop the story dead in its tracks. Good dialogue, on the other hand, draws the reader into the world the author has created. It serves to move the story along, provides valuable information to the reader, and brings the characters to life. However, even the best writers can have difficulty with this component of storytelling. To create the most effective dialogue, consider these important tips:

        • Pay attention to the way people talk. This can help you pick up on natural speech patterns and the expressions people use on a regular basis. It will also give you an idea of the flow and rhythm speech follows.
          • Refrain from making dialogue too consistent with reality. In real life, people use filler words such as like, uh, and um. These should be omitted in writing. In addition, you should only turn portions of conversation that are important to the story or characters into dialogue. Anything else can be summarized or cut.
            • Carefully consider the words and phrases that apply to each character. Make sure the dialogue "goes with" each role. For example, if a character is a swarthy pirate, he wouldn’t use perfect grammar – his "speech" needs to be more rough and less cultured. Dialogue can provide a each way to identify who is speaking within a passage.
            • Don’t provide too much information at once. Amateur writers have the tendency to force-feed information through dialogue. Characters should only say something that would come naturally to them. Important details should be spread throughout the story to pick up through a natural progression.
            • Stick with simple dialogue tags. “Said” is the most basic of these and in most cases it is all that is needed to identify the speaker. Some writers get too caught up trying to find synonyms for the word to add variety. Readers should be blind to tags as they read and using too many different words can pull them out of the dialogue.

            Following these tips will help make your characters and your dialogue come to life. Once you have perfected your dialogue and your manuscript is finished, all that’s left to do is contacting the book printer. CMYK Graphix has a professional book printing team that will help you customize and self-publish your manuscript into a completed and marketable book. They offer fast and easy book printing quotes online at http://www.cmykgraphix.com and do custom quotes by request. For more information, contact them at 1-800-698-2071 or email them today.

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            Ergonomics Part Two – Stay Pain-Free (A Book Printer’s Tips)

            Long before a self-publishing author can even think about sending their manuscript off to the book printer’s, they will be investing hours upon hours in front of a computer or typewriter. The writing process can take its toll on an author because, in order to get any amount of work done, a writer is required to work in the same position for hours at a time. As a result they are subject to a real possibility of repetitive strain injuries. Fortunately the study of ergonomics has uncovered the secrets of positioning and equipment use that makes these injuries preventable.

            Ergonomics can differ depending on whether you’re writing by hand or typing at a computer. Since many writers do both at some point it is imperative you understand the differences. Here are a few more important tips for reducing your pain as a writer:

            When setting up your computer screen:

            • The monitor should be an arm’s length away and the screen should be centered in your line of vision.
            • The top of the screen should be level with your eyes.
            • Adjust the height or tilt of the screen to eliminate light glare. This will reduce eye strain.

            To reduce contact stress while writing manually:

            • Use the lightest hold possible on the pen while still maintaining control.
            • Refrain from leaning on the wrist or forearm as you work.
            • Use a pen or pencil with a rubberized grip or increase traction by wrapping a rubber-band around its barrel.

            To avoid awkward postures:

            • Position the elbow at an angle greater than 90 degrees.
            • Keep your hand relaxed and avoid forceful bending or hyperextension of finger joints when holding your pen.
            • Use a sloped desk to avoid bending the neck or rounding the shoulders forward.

            Everyone knows a great book isn’t written in a day. It can take several weeks, months, and even years before it’s complete and ready for the book printer’s. If you’re able to work pain-free you can work longer and those hours will be spent concentrating on your book and not the pain you would otherwise be feeling.

            Once your work is finished, you’ll need to send it off to the book printer’s so your work can get on to bookstore shelves as soon as possible. For more information about self-publishing, contact the expert book printers at CMYKGraphix.com by calling them at 1-800-698-2071, or by emailing them today.

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